Other Briefs

From Food Assistance and Nutrition Information Series

  • Including Children's Views Can Enhance Our Understanding of Food Insecurity
  • The High Price of Food Exacts a High Price on Low-Income Children's Weight
  • One-Size Doesn't Fit All: Different Reasons Drive Food Stamp Use in Areas across the South
  • Food Stamps Target Those Most in Need
  • Incomes or Attitudes? What Determines Whether Mothers in the WIC Program Dilute or Concentrate Baby Formula
  • Rural Seniors Have Fewer Options for Healthy Diets
  • The South Does Not Make You Fat: A Study of Nutrition, Food Security, and Obesity

Check out the Food Assistance and Nutrition Information Series

Food Assistance and Nutrition Information Series

Including Children's Views Can Enhance Our Understanding of Food Insecurity

The High Price of Food Exacts a High Price on Low-Income Children's Weight

Research by
Maryah Stella Fram, Edward Frongillo and Sonya Jones, University of South Carolina

Meeting basic food needs was a struggle last year for more than one in five American households with children. This includes 22 percent of households outside metropolitan areas and 23 percent of households in the South.1 Parents in these situations often substitute a cup of tea or a large glass of water for a meal to ensure their kids never go without, or they take up their neighbor's offer to send the kids over for dinner. Above all, they strive to shelter their children from hardship –– if they can.

But do they? We know a lot from research about the strategies parents use to make ends meet, but we know very little about how children experience the fallout from thin budgets and bare cupboards. Maryah Stella Fram, Edward Frongillo and Sonya Jones, in their RIDGE working paper, "The Family Food Decision-Making Study," talk with 26 children and teens in rural and non-rural South Carolina to find out how they handle food insecurity.